Full-time working Americans spend, on average, 41 hours on the clock per week. A third of them work over 45 hours, and one-in-eight over 55.

In the industrial age, the idea of working between 40–55 hours per week sounded like pure delusion. We all learned about the backbreaking, dangerous, alienating working conditions of the late 1800s and early 1900s. Don’t be fooled. We still exist to serve someone else, and our very livelihoods are under threat each minute we take our being in the world for granted.

We are always tired. There is always something, whether in the back of…


Credit — wearecognitive.com

It’s perfectly natural to feel sympathetic, even if the circumstances causing your sympathy aren’t under your control. You sympathize with the homeless guy that never seems to fail in making eye contact with you on your commute to work — after all, one of you is sitting in a leather-padded seat, and the other in a makeshift tent. You also sympathize with the citizens of nations undergoing terrorist attacks. You sympathize with those struggling over the COVID-19 pandemic; the dying, sick, and dirt-poor.

The common denominator behind these everyday moments and our gravitation towards sympathizing with them is that we…


Incremental reform within America’s policing systems hasn’t been working. After the Ferguson shooting in 2014, where an 18-year old unarmed black man named Michael Brown was murdered at the hands of a white police officer, six cities — Pittsburgh, Stockton, Birmingham, Fort Worth, Gary, and Minneapolis — initiated policies meant to reduce the rates of police brutality and strengthen the bond between police departments and their citizens. …


Disasters cause loyalists. People look to our leaders for help, and — whether they receive it or not — are easily swayed into looking optimistically towards the future. Political figures give heartwarming speeches about how we will get through this as a nation, as we “always do”, and, among the heroic doctors and samaritans spending countless hours working to solve the crises, billionaires who chip into various charities are regarded as benevolent humanitarians. Rinse and repeat.

But for now, the subways remain crowded with working people, all of whom would rather be home. They’re stocking the aisles of Target with…


“As long as there have been men and they have lived, they have all felt this tragic ambiguity of their condition, but as long as there have been philosophers and they have thought, most of them have tried to mask it. They have striven to reduce mind to matter, or to reabsorb matter into mind, or to merge them within a single substance… They have denied death, either by integrating it with life or by promising to man immortality. Or, again they have denied life, considering it as a veil of illusion beneath which is hidden the truth of Nirvana……


“Let us consider the waiter in the cafe. His movement is quick and forward, a little too precise, a little too rapid. He comes towards the customers with a step a little too quick. He bends forward a little too eagerly; his voice, his eyes express an interest a little too solicitous for the order of the client… All his behaviour seems to us a game. He applies himself to linking his movements as if they were mechanisms, the one regulating the other; his gestures and even his voice seem to be mechanisms; he gives himself the quickness and pitiless…


“Eyes” by Henri Matisse, 1951.

Have you ever been sitting in some public place — say, a cafe or subway — and you glance up and see somebody really attractive? Attractive in a sense you can’t really explain. They’re just your type. Maybe it’s their clothes, or their hair, or their face, or height, or all of these put together. You go back to reading that book you were holding, but, now, you can’t really focus on the book as well as you were before. You can’t help but glance up again once in a while. They’re just minding their business, and you, yours —…


With the rise of Internet rap in the mid-2000s follows a new sound — one that aims to twist as many rules of contemporary rap music as possible. In his second EP, 5% Aquarium, Drool Audrey fuels the fire of modern experimental hip-hop through mind-bending trap-based production, vivid, outlandish storytelling, and deliberate, unconventional flows that ride over the beat with ease. Drool begins the EP with an opening line that promptly captures the unique absurdity of his sound: “Told this thot come over, let’s go see pink elephants / I just popped up like ‘ahoy’, I’m feeling excellent.” The production…


Kid A was born out of frustration.

The release of OK Computer in 1997 changed everything for Radiohead. It was fascinating, thought-provoking, critiquing, and — more than anything — emotional. Eerie, allusive commentaries on modern technology’s ability to brainwash, monotony in the working world, and a sense of impending doom from who-knows-what, along with masterful melodies and unforgettable drops, spread throughout the project with a chilling intensity. From the moment the album was released, they were critically-acclaimed as the “saviors of rock”, a group that could finally provide the blunt introspection the world needed to hear. …


The Baltimore Orioles are awful. Have you seen an Orioles game recently? (Of course, you haven’t.) The starting pitcher is likely to be a guy in his late-20s who you’ve never heard of before, with a fastball topping out at 91 and an ERA somewhere around the high 5s. The lineup is full of nobodies, rookies in misfitting positions, and Chris Davis — the king of bad contracts. Fans are showing up on “Aaron Brooks bobblehead night” so they can sell them on eBay to the fifteen dedicated Orioles fans left.

But among the hellfire that is the Baltimore Orioles…

Ethan Hekker

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